What We Offer


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A group of people are standing together and smiling at the camera.

Support Group Meetings: 

LAST can be contacted at LondonAutistics@gmail.com If you are Autistic, and want to get involved please e-mail us.

Currently we hold bi-weekly peer support meetings at Knollwood Public School. If you are in London, Ontario or area, please join us for snacks and a welcoming, safe, and understanding environment.

Our support group is open to all people on the Autism spectrum whether you have been able to access a formal diagnosis or not. Feel free to bring someone to support you.

The “What About Us” Neurodiversity Lending Library:

LAST has put together a library that is open on Monday nights at the same time as our support group meetings where members of the community can check out books, stim toys and other resources. Find out more Here.

A shelf of books and stim toys. There are stickers on the books and stim toys, and on the cupboards below the shelves that have the LAST logo on them.

Social Events:

LAST moderates a Facebook group (under the name London Autistics Standing Together) where autistic adults can connect on social media.

We also organize periodic social events, including bowling, and group movie nights. We are planning on expanding these events in the future.

Social events are posted to the Facebook group. Or you can e-mail LAST and ask to receive e-mails about upcoming events.

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Two people are holding shovels and planting trees. The woman is pretending to take a swing at the man and laughing. She is wearing sunglasses and has a red sweater around her waist. The man has his back to the camera and is wearing a black tank top and black pants.

OutLAST: 

We also moderate OutLAST, a LGBTQIA+ support group on Facebook. This group will not come up in searches to protect the privacy of our members, particularly those who are not “out” publicly. Please contact us if you are in the London Ontario area and wish to be included in this group. OutLAST also holds monthly in-person potlucks. Please contact us if you wish t be informed of the dates and times of potlucks. 

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A variation of the LAST logo. The two human figures in the logo are filled in with Trans and LGBT pride flags. Rainbow and lavender text reads: London Autistics Standing Together. OutLAST

Disability Rights Advocacy: 

In addition to our support group and social events, LAST organizes events geared towards disability rights, autism advocacy, and public education.

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A group of women and non-binary people in winter clothing are unpacking signs at a picnic table on a street corner. Some of the signs have photo graphs on them. One visible sign reads: LAST, London Autistics Standing Together. Fact: Autism is not an epidemic. Autism is not life ending. Comparing it to cancer is stigmatizing. A megaphone and speaker system is sitting on the picnic table.

In March 2017 LAST, in partnership with the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, organized the first vigil for the Disability Day of Mourning held in London Ontario. The DDOM vigils were first organized by ASAN to call attention to the deaths of disabled people at the hands of caregivers and family members, and to send a message that our lives as disabled people are worth living. It is a message that is important to our group. Even those of us who have not directly experienced abuse related to disability have been impacted by widespread stigma around autism. Negative attitudes put all of us at risk of discrimination and abusive behaviour, and negatively impact mental health in our community. We feel it is very important to counter stigma with a more positive narrative.

We are planning to continue Disability Rights advocacy in future events. Through ongoing advocacy LAST hopes to change the social perception of Autism and dispel negative stigma.

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A sign rests on top of a stack of painted banners. The sign reads: LAST, London Autistics Standing Together. Fact: Disabled people can live meaningful and fulfilling lives. (I can’t believe I had to write this on a sign)